Children do not enter this world with bad intentions

 

 

Today, I found this quote on my Facebook page:

 

“Children do not enter this world with bad intentions. They do not come to wear us out, test our patience, or push us over the edge. They come to us with a need for love, connection and belonging.” – Rebecca Eanes

 

Children come into this world knowing the truth. They live from a place of playfulness, oneness, and openness. They try to call us away from our busy schedules, our distractions, our tension. They want to save us from the craziness of this world and help us reconnect with who we truly are. We were all children once, and we carried the same wisdom inside until the adults around us told us we needed to give up “childish” ideas of playing in the streams, talking with animals, climbing trees and instead, get some “Real” work done.

 

Most of us were sent to school to have our “Childish” wisdom driven out of us. We were taught to compete with each other, rather than to connect, to learn self worth is measured by the grades we achieve. I remember my report cards saying, “An average student, could do better“.   I remember how those words made me feel at the age of 11, 12, 13 years old – a sinking feeling, a “Not good enough” feeling.  Our children, like us, are brainwashed into believing that who they are is not enough, that they must be constantly achieving something to be worthy human beings.

 

Imagine if we all grew up being told we were okay. That our childhood needs for love, belonging and connection was met. What kind of adults would we be now, if we had been allowed to unfold in our way, in our own time?  Maybe, humanity wouldn’t be in the mess it is in now.

 

 

 

 

6 thoughts on “Children do not enter this world with bad intentions

  1. Hi,
    I had this quote on my feed a few days ago as well. I actually was going to print it out to the parents I work with and was looking for the original source when I came across your blog. It has peeked my interest and will be delving deeper into it. I work with young children, thankfully in a program that honors a child’s individualism. Yet, I know there is much more to be learned. I am also a parent of a 3 year old “spunky” little girl and I am always constantly trying not to crush her spirit.

    I will look into your resources.

    Best,

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